About
Ph.D. Marina Martinic Kavur

Marina Martinić Kavur, Ph.D. holds a Bachelor's degree in Biology and Master's degree in experimental biology, field immunology, and physiology. She worked for one year on the project studying the bone morphogenetic protein at the University of Zagreb, a school Medicine and then went on to pursue a Ph.D. in the field of Molecular Biology from the University of Vienna. During her Ph.D. studies, she worked on the Institute of Molecular Pathology on imaging the live-cell dynamics of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint. Her efforts contributed to the generation of the first 4-dimensional map of proteins regulating human cell division, published in Nature. Since 2018. she works for Genos on several projects studying glycosylation in health and disease. 

 

Health

Your glycans could predict high blood pressure before it becomes a health issue

Cardiovascular diseases are still by far the main cause of mortality worldwide. High blood pressure or hypertension is one of the main risk factors for vascular diseases that is, according to the latest research, predictable – even years before the first symptoms.

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Glycoscience

A Roadmap to Future

The Sustainable Development Goals or Global Goals are a collection of 17 interlinked goals designed to be a "blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all". The SDGs were set in 2015 by the United Nations General Assembly and are intended to be achieved by the year 2030. Glycoscience plays a role in achieving eight of the seventeen.

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Health

Glycans as Drivers of a Disease Risk

The relative risk of many diseases increases with age. Individuals age at different rates, and while some might show a surprising level of health and fitness in their eight decades, others might be troubled by age-related diseases already in their late thirties. An increasing body of evidence suggests glycans play a role at establishing an individual’s risk of having poor health.

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Health

Can Glycans Predict the Loss of Kidney Function

Chronic kidney failure is one of the most common and debilitating complications of diabetes. Changes in glycosylation of immunoglobulin G (IgG) accompany biological agеing and regulates inflammation in diabetes – a process that participates in kidney function decline. A new study looks at the correlation between kidney function and IgG glycosylation.

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